Teen Orthodontic Treatment

Tips for wearing a mouthguard with braces

February 22nd, 2021

Adolescents are active, so it is no surprise that there are plenty of questions about mouthguards when it comes to orthodontic treatment. In general, a mouthguard is a great investment for protecting the teeth, especially in high-contact sports. They should be considered for many sports and activities, even if braces are not being worn. Here are some common questions and answers:

  • Can you wear a mouthguard if you have braces?

    Yes, you can wear a mouthguard when you have braces. There are special mouth guards that are made specifically to fit over braces.

  • What sports require a mouthguard with braces?

    Many high school sports associations require a mouthguard for football, hockey, field hockey, lacrosse, and wrestling. The ADA also recommends a mouthguard for other contact sports like basketball and martial arts, as well as other limited contact sports such as baseball, softball, and extreme sports.

  • Is it recommended to use a mouthguard while in braces?

    Unless specifically required by your sports association, it can be a personal decision based on your comfort level and ability to breath adequately while performing. The benefit of a mouth guard is it will limit damage to teeth and soft tissues around the mouth when worn properly. Not only will it help protect the teeth, but it will protect the lips and cheeks from injury from any orthodontic appliances.

  • What is the best mouthguard for braces?

    In our office, we have found that the Shock Doctor Braces Mouthguard has worked well for many patients. It has a strap so that it can be used in sports like football. The strap can also be removed so that it can be used in sports like basketball.

    [caption id="attachment_308" align="alignleft" width="300"] Shock Doctor ® Braces mouthguard[/caption]

  • Can you use a boil and bite mouthguard with braces?

    No, you should not use a build and bite mouth guard with your braces. It may wrap around the braces and get stuck in place, or cause damage to the braces. Also, keep in mind that the teeth are continuing to move, so you do not want to have a mouthguard specifically molded to your teeth as they are changing.

  • Can I use a custom made mouthguard while in braces?

    No, you will not likely be able to use a custom mouthguard since your teeth are still moving. The mouthguard will not fit for the duration of the treatment, and it may get stuck on the braces if it is forced in place.

  • Where can I get a mouthguard for braces?

    You can find a mouthguard for braces online or in some sporting goods stores. Some orthodontists may also have them in their office for patients. At Zach Frazier Orthodontics, we have the Shock Doctor Braces Mouthguard available in office for our patients.

  • Can I wear a mouthguard with Invisalign?

    If you are in Invisalign treatment, you should still wear a mouthguard for sports if it is recommended by your association or a sport with significant contact or injury risk (football, basketball, hockey). You can remove your Invisalign and use a general one-size-fits-all mouthguard while playing the sport. You will not be able to use a custom fitting or boil and bite mouthguard as your teeth are still moving. If you are in a non-contact or limited-contact sport, you should continue to wear your Invisalign while you are playing the sport.

  • Can I wear a mouthguard with a palatal expander?

    Yes, you can wear a mouthguard with a palatal expander. It will need to be trimmed and adjusted around the expander to allow it to fit properly.

I hope this is helpful to provide some insight on mouthguard recommendations for braces. As always, if you need more information, please reach out to our office anytime - we are happy to help : )

Tips for Managing TMJ Pain During Orthodontic Treatment: Questions and Answers

February 10th, 2021

According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial research, the prevalence of TMJ problems (also known as temporomandibular joint and muscle disorder) is between 5% - 12% of the population. It is more common in females than males, and tends to affect younger people more often.

While orthodontic treatment does not cause TMJ issues, studies also show that it cannot prevent or treat TMJ pain either. Here are some common questions that you may have if you are in orthodontic treatment and are now experiencing some jaw joint pain.

What does TMJ stand for and what is it?

  • TMJ stands for temporomandibular joint. It is located directly in front of your ears, and it is where your lower jaw hinges upon opening and closing.

What are TMJ problems?

  • TMJ problems include clicking/popping joints, painful joints, or restricted jaw movement. TMJ problems may vary in severity from mild pain to severe pain, and the pain may be a temporary pain or a constant pain. TMJ problems may be related to the actual joint (bones and ligaments), or it may be related to the muscles around the joint.

What causes TMJ problems?

  • TMJ problems may be caused by an injury to the face or jaw, grind/clenching of teeth, stress, muscle fatigue or overuse of the jaw joint. Additionally, it is linked to hormonal changes in women that cause laxity of the ligaments in the jaw joint. TMJ problems are most common in teenage girls and young women.

What can I do to improve my TMJ problems or TMJ pain?
Most TMJ problems can be managed by these conservative measures:

  • Maintain a soft diet, and avoid chewy food and chewing gum.
  • Use warm, moist heat on the jaw muscles to increase blood flow and massage the muscles. Alternate the warm moist heat with an ice pack on the joint area which will help reduce inflammation of the joints.
  • Use anti-inflammatory medications to help reduce pain and inflammation. Ibuprofen is the most common, but you should consult your physician with which anti-inflammatory medication is best for you.
  • Avoid clenching your teeth by setting up reminders to keep your teeth apart and jaw muscles relaxed.
  • Monitor your stress and manage it to avoid muscle tension and clenching.

What if my symptoms do not improve with conservative therapy?

  • If your symptoms are not improving, a referral will be made to another doctor who specifically manages TMJ problems. They may recommend more diagnostic imaging (like an MRI) to evaluate the jaw joint to find the cause of the problem. In some cases, a night guard may be recommended to help alleviate some pain.

Can I continue my orthodontic treatment?

  • In some cases, orthodontic treatment may be paused for a period of time, and occasionally it may be discontinued depending on the circumstances. The recommendations are on a case by case basis.

If you have any other questions, please let your orthodontist know. More often than not, a little patience and conservative measures will improve the TMJ pain, so hang in there : )

How we use technology to eliminate unpopular dental procedures

February 8th, 2021

Perhaps you have memories of sitting in a dental chair anxiously waiting for a dental impression (dental mold).  Memories of a cold, gooey mixture inching closer down your throat. Memories of drool hanging off the edge of your lip while the mold is held in place. The very thought of it for some people will make them gag!

We have good news for you: meet the intraoral scanner. While this technology has been out for some time, it is still not universally used. Here are some information about what it is and how it will make your trip to the orthodontist much better.

Dr. Zach Frazier, orthodontist in Downers Grove, with a 3D tooth scanner used for braces and Invisalign treatment.

  1. What is 3D digital intraoral scanner?

    1. It is a high-tech video camera that captures images of your teeth to create a 3D digital model of your teeth.
  2. Does it use any radiation like an x-ray?

    1. No radiation is used - it is simply a video camera that stitches many images together to create the 3D image of your teeth.
  3. How long does it take to have your teeth scanned?

    1. It depends on the experience of the user, but in most cases it will take less than 5 minutes to get a full scan of all of your upper and lower teeth.
  4. What do you do with the 3D image?

    1. We can use the image in lots of ways. We can use it to diagnose your bite or create 3D printed physical models of your teeth. With the printed models, we can make all sorts of orthodontic appliances and retainers without ever having to take a dental mold.
  5. Do you still have to take a mold to get retainers?

    1. No way : ) Our patients do not have to have dental impressions taken at any time.
  6. Can this be used for Invisalign clear aligner treatment?

    1. Yes! Additionally the aligners will be better fitting as a 3D intraoral scanner is more accurate than traditional dental molds.

We absolutely love the 3D intraoral scanners in our office. Treatment is dramatically more comfortable for our patients leading to a better experience. Additionally, we are getting more accurate orthodontic appliances which leads to better treatment and reduced time spent at the orthodontist. Finally, it is great form an environmental standpoint as there are fewer steps, fewer appointments, and less waste by using the scanner.

If you're interested in pursuing braces treatment or you are considering Invisalign clear aligner treatment, make sure you visit an orthodontist with a 3D intraoral scanner. You will thank me later ; )

9 Common Questions about Orthodontics

December 15th, 2019

We receive lots of questions every week from people interesting straightening their teeth to improve their smile and to create a healthy bite. Here are a few of our most popular questions and answers : )

  1. What is an orthodontist, and how is he/she different than my regular dentist?
    An orthodontist is a dental specialist who focuses only on treatment with braces, clear aligners (Invisalign), and retainers. An orthodontist has pursued 2-3 years of additional training beyond dental school in order to specialize in the growth and development of facial structures.
  2. What problems does an orthodontist fix?
    Common orthodontic problems include crowding or spacing of teeth, uneven smile, impacted or unerupted teeth, and improper jaw alignment.
  3. Will getting braces or orthodontic treatment hurt?
    Generally, there is a short period of discomfort for a couple of days in your teeth, gums, and cheeks as you mouth gets adjusted to the braces. Dr. Zach will discuss with you or your parents the best way to manage this discomfort.
  4. What is the best age to see Dr. Zach for a consultation?
    In general, anyone wishing to improve his or her smile can schedule an exam at any age, from children to adults! Most full orthodontic treatments will begin around age 11-13 to coincide with the start of adolescence and the loss of remaining baby teeth. However, some problems can still develop before this age and require a form of early treatment as early as age 7.
  5. How do I take care of my braces?
    Excellent brushing and flossing habits are necessary to take care of your braces and teeth. Also, you will need to follow our instructions on how to avoid any broken appliances and problems.
  6. How long will I have wear braces or Invisalign clear aligners?
    Treatment times will vary on an individual basis depending on your goals and how challenging the tooth movements will be. Treatment times can range from 6 months to 30 months, and the most common treatments average about 18-20 months for a beautiful smile.
  7. Do I still see my regular dentist every 6 months?
    Yes! It is absolutely necessary to see your general dentist every 6 months for regular check-ups and cleanings. The health of your teeth is our number one priority, and your dentist is essential in the maintenance of your teeth before, during, and after treatment.
  8. Will I have problems playing sports or musical instruments?
    Although there is an initial adjustment period, you should not have problems participating in your normal activities with braces. We recommend wearing a mouth guard during contact sports.
  9. Will I have to wear a retainer at the end of treatment?
    Yes, at the conclusion of orthodontic treatment, a retainer is required to maintain the result and keep your smile beautiful.

Still have more questions? Feel free to contact us here or call/text us anytime : ) We are happy to help!

Orthodontic insurance: 8 common questions

December 1st, 2019

Orthodontic insurance coverage can be very confusing to say the least. There are many nuances to the coverage, and it may vary year to year depending on your employer and the insurance company. Here are a few of the most common questions we are asked about insurance coverage for braces and Invisalign.

  1. How much of treatment is covered?
    1. It depends on the policy that has been chosen by your or your employer. It may vary greatly, with many policies covering approximately $1000 - $2500 per person on the policy.
  2. How does insurance pay out the benefit?
    1. Insurance usually pays the lifetime benefit over the course of treatment in monthly installments. It is not typical for them to pay it all out at once at the beginning of treatment, so to receive the full benefit, the plan must be active for the entire course of treatment.
  3. Is adult orthodontic treatment covered by insurance?
    1. In many instances, yes. This certainly depends on the insurance plan and the options chosen by your employer.
  4. Is Invisalign treatment covered by insurance?
    1. Yes, it is considered orthodontic treatment and can be applied to your lifetime orthodontic benefit.
  5. Should I be concerned my insurance will not pay their amount?
    1. No, the vast majority of claims are paid as expected. However, there are no guarantees. If there is a problem, the office can try to resolve it, or you may have to call the insurance company to resolve any payment discrepancies.
  6. What if my insurance does not pay as much as expected?
    1. In the case of underpayment, the remaining balance is owed by the patient for the services.
  7. What if I get new insurance during my treatment?
    1. Some insurances have a "work in progress" policies that allow the new insurance to pick up the coverage. In other cases, the new insurance may consider it an existing condition and may opt to not cover. Calling your insurance company before switching is always a good idea.
  8. How will I know insurance is making payments?
    1. Explanation of Benefits (EOBs) are sent to both the orthodontist and the patient so that you can review the payments being made on your behalf.

At Zach Frazier Orthodontics, we extend the extra courtesy to deal directly with your dental insurance provider. We verify and submit your insurance for you so that you do not have to deal with the hassle of filing insurance claims. If we expect insurance to cover a portion of your treatment, we will collect directly from them to reduce your monthly payment to make treatment more affordable.

Have more questions about dental insurance? Feel free to reach out - we are happy to help : ) We are experienced in helping many patients with braces and Invisalign in Downers Grove!  

 

4 tips for affordable braces & Invisalign® in 2020

November 8th, 2019

Hey parents - we get it. Finding room in the family budget for straight teeth is a challenge amongst everything else going on. Sports uniforms, piano lessons, iPhones, vacations - kids sure are expensive. And I totally understand - I have kids of my own, and there always seems to be something coming up.

Looking ahead to 2020, I want to help by giving you some honest and actionable advice to help you save on your orthodontic treatment. It may take a little research, but it will be well worth it in the end!

  1. Employer Insurance Plans:

    If you are looking at plans for 2020 and your employer offers an option with an orthodontic benefit, the best time to plan is now. Schedule a consultation with an orthodontist to see if your child will need braces in 2020. If they do, then you can do the math to see if the extra premium is worth it. If they don't, see if you can get a timeline of when he or she will be ready. This way you only pay the additional premium if you're going to use it.

  2. Insurance Networks:

    Many people do not realize it, but going to an in-network dentist has many advantages that are not often discussed. They are not discussed because many dentists do not participate with insurances. They may say "we work with your insurance," but the true value for you is when they are actually in-network. In many cases, your lifetime orthodontic benefit will be greater if you go to an in-network orthodontist, and their fees are set by the insurance company so they are very reasonable and fair. If you venture out-of-network, the provider can charge you literally whatever they want to!

  3. Flexible Spending Accounts and Health Savings Accounts:

    FSAs are a great way to take advantage of your employer benefits to help reduce some out-of-pocket costs on orthodontic treatment. Visit your orthodontist before you set your FSA limits for 2020 to find out how you can plan your payments. HSAs are also a great way to use pre-tax dollars to your benefit to pay for orthodontic treatment.

  4. Payment Plans:

    Most orthodontists will offer in-house financing with 0% interest on the monthly payments. This can be a huge advantage for a family trying to budget out the cost of braces or Invisalign® for multiple kids, so be sure to talk with the office to see how the payments can be arranged. You may be surprised to find out that offices are willing to finance beyond the treatment time or accept a small down payment as low as a couple hundred dollars. All you have to do is ask : )

At Zach Frazier Orthodontics, we take pride in our ability to make treatment affordable while maintaining the highest standards of care and customer service. How do we do it? Well, frankly, we are different than most offices in that we do the following:

As a member of the community, I would not be able to do my job any other way. My patients are your friends, your family, and your neighbors; and we are proud of our reputation. Feel free to send us a text or email - we are here to help you : )

#loveyoursmile
- Dr. Zach

Missing Teeth, Impacted Canines, and Your Family Tree

August 24th, 2019

Teeth genetics are weird. There is so much variation in size, shape, and color teeth. There is also a lot of variation when it comes to timing of when baby teeth are lost. We are all so different from one another, with a few exceptions: our teeth are very much like those of our parents and siblings.

Teeth abnormalities are pretty common in the general public, and many people are affected by them. For example, approximately 30% of people are missing at least one tooth. This is most commonly a wisdom tooth. Also, approximately 2-3% of the population has an impacted canine, where the canine is stuck in the bone and does not want to come in. It is more common on the left side than the right side (how weird!) and it is more common in girls than boys (sorry ladies!).

As a parent, it is important to keep this in mind. Are you missing an adult tooth, or was your brother or sister missing a tooth? Do you still have a baby tooth in your mouth? Do you remember having braces to fix an impacted canine? Your kids will be more at risk for similar problems. Impacted canine teeth can damage other adult teeth, and missing teeth can be a dental problem in the future if not addressed early.

So what do you do? It's simple - get a screening early. I recommend having an orthodontic  screening at age 8 to evaluate for these conditions early. We take a panoramic x-ray that looks at all of the developing teeth so that we can see if any of these problems may occur. Most orthodontists do not charge for this screening, and it basically informational to help you understand your child's current or future needs.

Is it OK to have a screening even if you didn't have these problems? Yes - definitely! You may not know that grandma or great-uncle was missing 4 adult teeth. Additionally, we are screening for more than just missing teeth. We look for crowding issues, spacing issues, overbites, underbites, cross bites, and much more.

At the end of the day, please do not lose sleep over any of these issues. Genetics is out of your control, but we are here to help however we can. We can correct impacted teeth, missing teeth, and bite issues in many different ways with braces and Invisalign®. Feel free to reach out with any question : )

Take care and love your smile!
Dr. Zach

Direct-to-Consumer Orthodontic Treatment - What to know before you consider being your own orthodontist

February 25th, 2019

Direct-to-consumer orthodontic treatment has been expanding quickly with new companies entering the market all the time. While it may seem like it is harmless to straighten your teeth on your own, the truth is that unsupervised health care treatment can have negative effects. As an orthodontic specialist and an expert in the art and science of moving teeth to create amazing smiles and healthy bites, I am obviously biased. Nevertheless, I believe as a  professional, it is my duty to my community to shed light on some of the things the DIY companies fail to talk about. Let's break down the three most common reasons people participate with DIY orthodontics from both sides!

First, let's take a look at some of the real reasons someone might consider the DIY option:
1) Cost - all of these companies market against one another for the cheapest solution and thus use the cheapest means to deliver the treatment. However, they don't have many of the costs an orthodontic office has with team members, an office space, and the latest in-office dental technology. This makes for a cheaper alternative to seeing a professional.
2) No appointments - no visits to the doctor's office means that you get to do all the treatment from your home and can progress the treatment as it fits your own schedule.
3) Convenience - for the first molding of your teeth, they will send you materials to your house so you can do the molding yourself. Then, the aligners are delivered directly to you.

While the reasons may seem valid and make sense, there are some issues with this reasoning:
1) Cheaper materials means you will likely get lower quality treatment. While this may not matter at first, when the result is low quality, you may wonder how much money you actually saved for getting a less than ideal result. As they say, you get what you pay for : )
2) When your care is not supervised by an orthodontist, you are responsible for monitoring your own outcome and the side effects of treatment. If you aren't aware of what to look for, you may end up in a worse spot than where you started. For example, you may have closed the gap in your teeth, but now your bite does not fit together. Or you may have corrected that crooked tooth, but now there is excessive gum loss. Orthodontic appointments in our office are typically pretty short and painless - they are worth it to ensure the best result.
3) While it may be convenient to do all of this in your pajamas at home, you should really have a professional exam and x-rays prior to starting. There is a lot of nuance to orthodontic treatment. Even if a company claims you will have a "doctor assigned to you," if you don't know whom he/she is, how can you be sure they really care about your outcome? It is all up to you!

A few other considerations:
1) In our office, we use Invisalign which incorporates a series of attachments on the teeth along with other appliances to ensure a smooth experience and a great result. Attachments are bonded to your teeth to help them move. DIY orthodontics may work for some very limited and minor movements, but chances are if you want a more dramatic change, you will need something more robust to complete the complex tooth movements.
2) Orthodontic treatment can be a significant expense and we acknowledge that. However, we offer very flexible payment plans and we will work with insurance to keep the cost very reasonable. When you break it down, it might not cost that much more to see an orthodontist and in fact, with insurance, it may not be much different than a DTC company's cost.

While DTC orthodontic treatment may be tempting for a few reasons, I encourage you to seek an orthodontic consultation if you are curious about straightening your teeth. We don't charge anything for a consultation, so it is very low risk! We can guide you and educate you on the best way to achieve your goals, and we can save you time and money in the long run.

I have some patients that attempted the DTC route prior to coming to our Downers Grove office, and every single one of them wished they didn't waste the time or money trying to go it alone. The advertising makes it sound so simple and easy. But, how often do you cut your own hair? There are so many things that we could do ourselves, but we know if we trust someone with experience, the result will be so much better!

Now go out there and find your neighborhood orthodontist : )

- Dr. Zach

Keep Your Kids and Their Teeth Safe!

November 2nd, 2018

In the past couple weeks, we have seen multiple children with injuries from one thing - trampolines! I know - the kids love them and they seem fun, but an article by the American Academy of Pediatrics estimates that there are about 100,000 emergency room visits per year due to trampoline injuries. That is a lot!

The injuries can range in severity, from bone fractures to sprains to spinal cord injuries. With trampoline parks becoming more and more popular for birthday parties and events, we have to make sure we are considering the safety of our children.

So why is the orthodontist talking about this? Teeth can get pretty banged up by trampoline injuries as well. The teeth can be displaced or pushed back into the bone due to heavy impact, and this can compromise the tooth forever by damaging the nerve and blood supply. If the nerve and blood supply are damaged, root canals and crowns may be necessary on the front teeth which will lead to tens of thousands of dollars in lifetime maintenance of these critical front teeth. Even worse, front teeth may be completely knocked out and lost from trampoline injuries.

The front teeth are a critical component of our smile, and although the injury can be expensive, the effect it will have on a smile is even more devastating. A lifetime of fake or missing teeth in the front is not worth the risk. We cannot protect our kids from every injury in the world, but in my opinion, I recommend that your kids skip the trampoline park!

- Dr. Zach

IT'S ABOUT MORE THAN JUST STRAIGHT TEETH

October 13th, 2018

Orthodontics is awesome. Using braces or Invisalign, we have the ability to shape a person's smile over the course of 12-24 months. It's simply amazing to see the transformation in esthetics and bite correction along the way.

Traditionally, orthodontics has been focused on just the teeth - which, I agree, is the main point : ) - but there is so much more to it than just straightening teeth. The teeth, more importantly, are the focal point in the smile. A smile is our own, personal, lifelong asset that is truly unique to us. It conveys emotion to our friends, family, and strangers, and it will show up in photos that capture the most important memories and events of our lives.

It should come as no surprise that with so much emphasis on our smile, some people are truly not happy with it. They may feel they have to hide it, or worse, that others are teasing them in school because of their appearance. This can be very challenging for both kids and adults alike, and this is why orthodontics is so much more powerful than straight teeth.

 

In the course of wearing braces or Invisalign, we get to see the change in confidence and self-esteem of so many people. It is truly gratifying to know that treatment can affect a person's life in such profound ways. There are many studies that support that orthodontic treatment has positive psychosocial effects, and this is truly what it is all about.

It's about improving lives by improving smiles. It's about feeling confident in all those important moments in life. It's about giving your child more self-esteem in all those awkward years of their young lives. It's about looking back at photos of those milestone days of our lives and really appreciating that each and every one of us has a unique smile, and we should not be afraid to show it : )

- Dr. Zach

 

Retainers for LIFE : )

August 19th, 2018

Many people are surprised to learn that the teeth continue to move throughout life. This always leads to many questions about retainers and keeping the teeth straight. Let's dive into a few common questions.

Why do we need retainers?
Retainers help keep the teeth straight after they have been aligned with braces or Invisalign. Our teeth are held into the bone by ligaments, and over time as we age, our bones and ligaments change. As these changes occur, our teeth will unfortunately move.Example of teeth that shifted due to lack of retainer wear. We corrected the teeth with Invisalign, and placed a "fixed" retainer glued to the back of the teeth to prevent future shifting.

What types of retainers are there?
Retainers come in many shapes and forms. In our office, we use three main types of retainers. We use "fixed" retainers (AKA glued retainers, bonded retainers, permanent retainers) in many cases to hold the lower teeth straight. We use these retainers often because the lower front teeth tend be the teeth most affected by crowding as an adult. We use clear retainers (AKA Essix retainers, Invisalign retainers) in most cases, and these retainers wrap around the entire surface of your teeth like a mouthguard. In some cases, we use Hawley retainers (AKA wire retainers) which are made of acrylic and wire. Depending on your circumstance, we recommend what is best for you and give you options.

Will may retainers last forever?
We wish they could last forever, but just like anything else - glasses, shoes, etc. - they will wear out over time and need to be replaced. They tend to last longer if they are well maintained and cleaned regularly. If you need to have them replaced or feel that some teeth are shifting, make sure to call us to replace it before teeth move too much.

How long do we need to wear retainers?
The honest answer is you need to wear them as long as you want to keep straight teeth : )  Everybody is different, and some people may experience very minimal shifting without retainers while others will see lots of shifting. Unfortunately, we cannot predict whose teeth will move and whose will not, so many orthodontists now recommend "lifetime retention" to ensure a beautiful, straight smile. Dr. Zach is definitely on board with "lifetime retention" and he still wears his retainers to keep his teeth straight.

Think of this way: If you wear glasses or contacts, you must use them in order to see. They are simply a tool to help you see more clearly. Retainers are essentially the same thing: they are just a tool to help keep your teeth straight. So when you go to bed, you wear retainers as part of your maintenance to your body. It's that simple!

Wear your retainers : )
- Dr. Zach

Simplified Braces Diet

July 9th, 2018

The first thing anyone asks when they hear they need braces is inevitably "What am I going to be able to eat?!?!" Many people worry that they will not be able to eat the foods they enjoy, and that is not necessarily the truth. Although we encourage that some of the hard foods listed below are avoided, there are ways to still enjoy some of these foods. On the other hand, sticky candy and chewy snacks with high sugar content should be avoided - with or without braces on : )

If you take a quick look at our list below, you will also see items like hard bread, chips, and popcorn. Occasionally, these foods can be eaten, and with careful chewing, these foods can still be enjoyed during your braces journey. You will also note the delicious foods listed at the bottom - apples, corn, chicken legs, and ribs - that can be eaten by just breaking them down into smaller pieces before you take a bite.

So why do we have a special braces diet? Basically, it comes down to two things. The first is that candy and sugary snacks are in the hard, sticky food department, and these foods are not good for your teeth as they promote plaque to form acid on the teeth. The acid can erode the teeth and lead to white scars around the braces. The second is simple - hard and sticky foods will break the braces which leads to more appointments and more time in the braces.

So don't worry - you will still get to eat well as you make the commitment to a straighter smile. Questions about other foods not on the list? Fee free to reach to us anytime - we would be happy to help guide you!

- Dr. Zach

7 Common Questions About Invisalign Clear Aligners

June 15th, 2018

Clear aligner treatment, like Invisalign, is another tool that we use to straighten your teeth and give you an awesome smile. As someone who has gone through Invisalign treatment myself, I can tell you that is relatively easy and well worth the investment. While many people are familiar with braces, we get a lot of questions regarding Invisalign. Here are just a few of our most popular questions:

How does Invisalign work?
Invisalign is a series of clear, plastic retainers that put pressure on the teeth in order to move them. Each one has a small movement built into the shape of the aligner, and progressively over time, the slight changes in shape lead to dramatic changes in your smile and bite.

What are the "bumps" or attachments on the teeth?
For most cases, small attachments or "bumps" are glued to the teeth with transparent dental filling material. This material is the same thing dentists use to fix cavities on your teeth, and they are removed at the end. The small attachments allow for more complex movements of the teeth to ensure we can deliver the result you deserve.

Are my teeth going to be sore?
Any time we apply pressure to a tooth, it will be sore. Teeth don't know whether they are being pushed by braces, Invisalign, or a retainer. The adjustment period is usually about one week at the start of treatment, and it can be easily handled with a softer diet and over-the-counter pain medication.

How often do I wear them?
In order to be effective in changing your smile, they must be worn at least 22 hours per day. There really is no exception to this rule as teeth need constant pressure to change their position. They are removed for eating and brushing, and each aligner is replaced by a new on a weekly basis in most cases.

How long does the total treatment take?
Invisalign treatment time varies based on the complexity of your treatment. Some cases require more movement and bite correction. A typical Invisalign treatment may range from 4 months for small movements to 24 months for complex movements. However, the average time in treatment is usually around 12 to 15 months.

Does dental insurance cover Invisalign treatment?
Yes - if your dental insurance has orthodontic coverage, the benefit may be used for braces or Invisalign. This is great news as you can choose the treatment option that best suits you and your lifestyle. We offer flexible payment plans which makes treatment much more affordable than people expect.

How do I know if Invisalign is right for me?
Invisalign treatment does require excellent participation during treatment, but the benefits are huge! If you would like to change your smile without compromising esthetics or your diet, Invisalign may be a great choice for you. The best way to find out if you are a candidate is to schedule a complimentary consultation with our office.

Want more information about your Invisalign experience with our office? Give us a call or send an email - we are always happy to help : )

- Dr. Zach

Request a Complimentary Consultation
Contact Us!
call email